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Namaste becomes latest Goodweave supporter

GoodweaveNamasteRetailer and wholesaler Namaste has become the latest company to support rug certification scheme GoodWeave.

The company specialises in fairly produced products, including a wide selection of Indian made Kilims and flatweaves.
‘We work with many rug suppliers in India and have been selling fairly traded rugs for years. We have taken this additional step, to provide the added reassurance of a totally independent monitoring and inspection body which has a proven and excellent track-record. GoodWeave is an award-winning, pioneering charity and we look forward to an exciting future with them,’ says Rachel Brummitt, Namaste director.
All of Namaste’s certified rugs will now carry a numbered GoodWeave label on the reverse, which confirms that it has been produced by a supplier which meets the GoodWeave Standard and is randomly inspected by GoodWeave inspectors.
Founded in 1995, GoodWeave is seeking to end child labour by harnessing the power of the marketplace. The organisation works at both ends of the supply chain – growing market preference for certified product in consumer countries and inspecting production sites along South Asia’s carpet belt.
Any child found working is offered counselling, medical care, education and, if needed, a home. GoodWeave has also established 17 Child Friendly Communities, where no industry employs an underage child and where the community is supportive of all children attending school and not working.
These social programmes are supported by the sale of certified rugs by licensed importers. In the UK there are 20 GoodWeave licensees, including The Rug Company, Matthew Wailes, and Jacaranda Carpets. To date, GoodWeave has directly freed more than 3,600 children from labour on the looms, educated nearly 15,000 children, and improved the working conditions for 50,000 weavers, in partnership with over 130 import brands worldwide. On its 20th anniversary in 2015, it announced the expansion of the model to Nepal’s brick kilns and India’s clothing industry.